Kafka/Visual Studio Code/OSS… Distibuted Consensus, Things to Learn

A Few Streams to Learn From: Apacha Kafka!

Here I am in the middle of Qcon SF, about to enjoy the “Demystifying Stream Processing with Apache Kafka” talk with Neha Narkhede @nehanarkhede. The background on this talk is rooted in Neha being a co-founder of Confluent.io, with co-founder Jay Kreps of Karka co-creation fame. Neha is providing a fundamental talk on the insight and usage of streams across distributed systems.

That second tweet was of the room before we had to move to the keynote space to make room for everybody that was interested in the topic! Holy snikies!

If you’d like to read some more information on Kafka and streaming, check out some of these posts.

I’m looking forward to digging into Kafka and various uses in the coming weeks. My current job (more on that REAL soon, and yes I said job). I’ve got some heavy data (big data just isn’t even discriptive, and I’m going with the Marty McFly terminology of “Heavy” and adding “Data” to form a more descriptive and unique term).  ;)

Visual Studio Code goes OSS & more Wicked F#!

As I’m sitting listening to Neha’s talk I see a stream (because I multi-task like a crazy person) of things getting mentioned about something something OSS and something something F# and something something Visual Studio Code. So even though we’re heavy into the middle of compaction, stream processings, discussions of queue points and how to manage so many things Kafka using a library with kstream DSL, processor API, and interfaces in a library Neha is discussing. It’s very interesting so

I’m going back and forth between what Neha is talking about, taking notes on the specific topic points I’ll need to research after her talk, and reading up on these something something OSS something something F# somethign something Visual Studio Code tweets. Then I stumbled into the rabbit hole of goodies that I was seeing…

Visual Studio Code is OSS now w/ F# Goodies!


At least, that’s my first response because this fixes my #1 complaint about Visual Studio Code. I hated that it wasn’t open source, when there was very little reason for it to be closed source. So much of it was open already, it just seemed confusingly absurd that it wasn’t open source. But here it is, wide open and ready for PRs yo!

The Marketplace for Visual Studio now has a few new goodies for F# too which is excellent!


Most of this is mentioned on the Visual Studio Code blog of course, but I’m outlining a few of the bits here, since I know not too many follow the VSC blog that read my blog – for various good reasons!  ;)

With that, I leave you with the two key tidbits that worked their way into my brain while I enjoyed learning about Kafka in Neha’s talk. Cheers!



_____101 |> F# Coding Ecosystem: Paket && Atom w/ Paket

One extremely useful tool to use with F# is Paket. Paket is a package manager that provides a super clean way to manage your dependencies. Paket can handle everything from Nuget dependencies to git or file dependencies. It really opens up your project capabilities to easily pull in and handle dependencies, whereever they are located.

I cloned the Paket Project first, since I would like to have the very latest and help out if anything came up. For more information on Paket check out the about page.

git clone git@github.com:fsprojects/Paket.git

I built that project with the respective ./build.sh script and all went well.


NOTE – Get That Command Line Action

One thing I didn’t notice immediately in the docs (I’m putting in a PR right after this blog entry) was anyway to actually get Paket setup for the command line. On bash, Windows, or whatever, it seemed a pretty fundamental missing piece so I’m going to doc that right here but also submit a PR based on the issue I added here). It could be I just missed it, but either way, here’s the next step that will get you setup the rest of the way.


Yeah, that’s all it was. Kind of silly eh? Maybe that’s why it isn’t documented that I could see? After the installation script is run, just execute paket and you’ll get the list of the various commands, as shown below.

$ paket
Paket version
Command was:
available commands:

	add: Adds a new package to your paket.dependencies file.
	config: Allows to store global configuration values like NuGet credentials.
	convert-from-nuget: Converts from using NuGet to Paket.
	find-refs: Finds all project files that have the given NuGet packages installed.
	init: Creates an empty paket.dependencies file in the working directory.
	auto-restore: Enables or disables automatic Package Restore in Visual Studio during the build process.
	install: Download the dependencies specified by the paket.dependencies or paket.lock file into the `packages/` directory and update projects.
	outdated: Lists all dependencies that have newer versions available.
	remove: Removes a package from your paket.dependencies file and all paket.references files.
	restore: Download the dependencies specified by the paket.lock file into the `packages/` directory.
	simplify: Simplifies your paket.dependencies file by removing transitive dependencies.
	update: Update one or all dependencies to their latest version and update projects.
	find-packages: EXPERIMENTAL: Allows to search for packages.
	find-package-versions: EXPERIMENTAL: Allows to search for package versions.
	show-installed-packages: EXPERIMENTAL: Shows all installed top-level packages.
	pack: Packs all paket.template files within this repository
	push: Pushes all `.nupkg` files from the given directory.

	--help [-h|/h|/help|/?]: display this list of options.

Paket Elsewhere && Atom

If you’re interested in Paket with Visual Studio I’ll let you dig into that on your own. Some resources are Paket Visual Studio on Github and Paket for Visual Studio. What I was curious though was Paket integration with either Atom or Visual Studio Code.

Krzysztof Cieślak (@k_cieslak) and Stephen Forkmann (@sforkmann) maintain the Paket.Atom Project and Krzysztof Cieślak also handles the atom-fsharp project for Atom. Watch this gif for some of the awesome goodies that Atom gets with the Paket.Atom Plugin.

Click for fullsize image of the gif.

Click for fullsize image of the gif.

Getting Started and Adding Dependencies

I’m hacking along and want to add some libraries, how do I do that with Paket? Let’s take a look. This is actually super easy, and doesn’t make the project dependentant on peripheral tooling like Visual Studio when using Paket.

The first thing to do, is inside the directory or project where I need the dependency I’ll intialize the it for paket.

paket init

The next step is to add the dependency or dependencies that I’ll need. I’ll add a Nuget package that I’ll need shortly. The first package I want to grab for this project is FsUnit, a testing framework project managed and maintained by Dan Mohl @dmohl and Sergey Tihon @sergey_tihon.

paket add nuget FsUnit

When executing this dependency addition the results displayed show what other dependencies were installed and which versions were pegged for this particular dependency.

✔ ~/Codez/sharpPaketsExample
15:33 $ paket add nuget FsUnit
Paket version
Adding FsUnit to /Users/halla/Codez/sharpPaketsExample/paket.dependencies
Resolving packages:
 - FsUnit 1.3.1
 - NUnit 2.6.4
Locked version resolution written to /Users/halla/Codez/sharpPaketsExample/paket.lock
Dependencies files saved to /Users/halla/Codez/sharpPaketsExample/paket.dependencies
Downloading FsUnit 1.3.1 to /Users/halla/.local/share/NuGet/Cache/FsUnit.1.3.1.nupkg
NUnit 2.6.4 unzipped to /Users/halla/Codez/sharpPaketsExample/packages/NUnit
FsUnit 1.3.1 unzipped to /Users/halla/Codez/sharpPaketsExample/packages/FsUnit
3 seconds - ready.

I took a look in the packet.dependencies and packet.lock file to see what were added for me with the paket add nuget command. The packet.dependencies file looked like this now.

source https://nuget.org/api/v2

nuget FsUnit

The packet.lock file looked like this.

  remote: https://nuget.org/api/v2
    FsUnit (1.3.1)
      NUnit (2.6.4)
    NUnit (2.6.4)

There are a few more dependencies that I want, so I went to work adding those. First of this batch that I added was FAKE (more on this in a subsequent blog entry), which is a build tool based off of RAKE.

paket add nuget FAKE

Next up was FsCheck.

paket add nuget FsCheck

The paket.dependencies file now had the following content.

source https://nuget.org/api/v2

nuget FAKE
nuget FsCheck
nuget FsUnit

The paket.lock file had the following items added.

  remote: https://nuget.org/api/v2
    FAKE (4.1.4)
    FsCheck (2.0.7)
      FSharp.Core (>=
    FSharp.Core (
    FsUnit (1.3.1)
      NUnit (2.6.4)
    NUnit (2.6.4)

Well, that got me started. The code repository at this state is located on this branch here of the sharpSystemExamples repository. So on to some coding and the next topic. Keep reading, subsribe, or hit me up on twitter @adron.


_____100 |> F# Some Troubleshooting Linux

In the last article I wrote on writing a code kata with F# on OS-X or Windows, I had wanted to use Linux but things just weren’t cooperating with me. Well, since that article I have resolved some of the issues I ran into, and this is the log of those issues.

Issue 1: “How can I resolve the “Could not fix timestamps in …” “…Error: The requested feature is not implemented.””

The first issue I ran into with running the ProjectScaffold build on Linux I wrote up and posted to Stack Overflow titled “How can I resolve the “Could not fix timestamps in …” “…Error: The requested feature is not implemented.”“. You can read more about the errors I receiving on the StackOverflow Article, but below is the immediate fix. This fix should probably be added to any F# Installation instructions for Linux as part of the default.

First ensure that you have the latest version of mono. If you use the instructions to do a make and make install off of the fsharp.org site you may not actually have the latest version of mono. Instead, here’s a good way to get the latest version of mono using apt-get. More information can be found about this on the mono page here.

apt-get install mono-devel
apt-get install mono-complete

Issue 2: “ProjectScaffold Error on Linux Generating Documentation”

The second issue I ran into I also posted to Stack Overflow titled “ProjectScaffold Error on Linux Generating Documentation“. This one took a lot more effort. It also spilled over from Stack Overflow to become an actual Github Issue (323) on the project. So check out those issues in case you run into any issues there.

In the next issue, to be published tomorrow, I’ll have some script tricks to use mono more efficiently to run *.exe commands and get things done with paket and fake in F# running on any operating system.

______10 |> F# – Moar Thinking Functionally (Notes)

More notes on the “Thinking Functionally” series. Previous notes are @ “_______1 |> F# – Getting Started, Thinking Functionally“.

#6 Partial Application

Breaking down functions into single parameter functions is the mathematically correct way of doing it, but that is not the only reason it is done — it also leads to a very powerful technique called partial function application.

For example:

let add42 = (+) 42 // partial application
add42 1
add42 3

[1;2;3] |> List.map add42

let twoIsLessThan = (<) 2 // partial application twoIsLessThan 1 twoIsLessThan 3 // filter each element with the twoIsLessThan function [1;2;3] |> List.filter twoIsLessThan

let printer = printfn "printing param=%i"

[1;2;3] |> List.iter printer

Each case a partially applied function above it can then be reused in multiple contexts. It can also fix function parameters.

let add1 = (+) 1
let add1ToEach = List.map add1   // fix the "add1" function

add1ToEach [1;2;3;4]

let filterEvens =
   List.filter (fun i -> i%2 = 0) // fix the filter function

filterEvens [1;2;3;4]

Then the following shows plug in behavior that is transparent.

let adderWithPluggableLogger logger x y =
    logger "x" x
    logger "y" y
    let result = x + y
    logger "x+y"  result

let consoleLogger argName argValue =
    printfn "%s=%A" argName argValue 

let addWithConsoleLogger = adderWithPluggableLogger consoleLogger
addWithConsoleLogger  1 2
addWithConsoleLogger  42 99

let popupLogger argName argValue =
    let message = sprintf "%s=%A" argName argValue
      |> ignore

let addWithPopupLogger  = adderWithPluggableLogger popupLogger
addWithPopupLogger  1 2
addWithPopupLogger  42 99

Designing Functions for Partial Application

Sample calls to the list library:

List.map    (fun i -> i+1) [0;1;2;3]
List.filter (fun i -> i>1) [0;1;2;3]
List.sortBy (fun i -> -i ) [0;1;2;3]

Here are the same examples using partial application:

let eachAdd1 = List.map (fun i -> i+1)
eachAdd1 [0;1;2;3]

let excludeOneOrLess = List.filter (fun i -> i>1)
excludeOneOrLess [0;1;2;3]

let sortDesc = List.sortBy (fun i -> -i)
sortDesc [0;1;2;3]

Commonly accepted guidelines to multi-parameter function design.

  1. Put earlier: parameters ore likely to be static. The parameters that are most likely to be “fixed” with partial application should be first.
  2. Put last: the data structure or collection (or most varying argument). Makes it easier to pipe a structure or collection from function to function. Like:
    let result =
       |> List.map (fun i -> i+1)
       |> List.filter (fun i -> i>5)
  3. For well-known operations such as “subtract”, put in the expected order.

Wrapping BCL Function for Partial Application

Since the data parameter is generally last versus most BCL calls that have the data parameter first, it’s good to wrap the BCL.

let replace oldStr newStr (s:string) =
  s.Replace(oldValue=oldStr, newValue=newStr)

let startsWith lookFor (s:string) =

Then pipes can be used with the BCL call in the expected way.

let result =
     |> replace "h" "j"
     |> startsWith "j"

["the"; "quick"; "brown"; "fox"]
     |> List.filter (startsWith "f")

…or we can use function composition.

let compositeOp = replace "h" "j" >> startsWith "j"
let result = compositeOp "hello"

Understanding the Pipe Function

The pipe function is defined as:

let (|>) x f = f x

It allows us to put the function argument in front of the function instead of after.

let doSomething x y z = x+y+z
doSomething 1 2 3

If the function has multiple parameters, then it appears that the input is the final parameter. Actually what is happening is that the function is partially applied, returning a function that has a single parameter: the input.

let doSomething x y  =
   let intermediateFn z = x+y+z
   intermediateFn        // return intermediateFn

let doSomethingPartial = doSomething 1 2
doSomethingPartial 3
3 |> doSomethingPartial

#7 Function Associativity and Composition

Function Associativity


let F x y z = x y z

…means this…

let F x y z = (x y) z

Also three equivalent forms.

let F x y z = x (y z)
let F x y z = y z |> x
let F x y z = x <| y z

Function Composition

Here’s an example

let f (x:int) = float x * 3.0  // f is int->float
let g (x:float) = x > 4.0      // g is float->bool

We can create a new function h that takes the output of “f” and uses it as the input for “g”.

let h (x:int) =
    let y = f(x)
    g(y)                   // return output of g

A much more compact way is this:

let h (x:int) = g ( f(x) ) // h is int->bool

h 1
h 2

These are notes, to read more check out the Function Composition.

______11 |> F# – Some Hackery – A String Calculator Kata

Now for some F# hacking. The first thing I did was actually go through a Code Kata, which I’ll present here.

The first step I took was to get a project started. For that I used the ProjectScaffold to build a clean project via bash.

First cloned…

git clone git@github.com:fsprojects/ProjectScaffold.git sharpKataStringCalc

…then I navigated into the directory and executed the build.sh script…

cd sharpKataStringCalc/

…then I got prompted for some input.


# Project Scaffold Init Script
# Please answer a few questions and we will generate
# two files:
# build.fsx               This will be your build script
# docs/tools/generate.fsx This script will generate your
#                         documentation
# NOTE: Aside from the Project Name, you may leave any
# of these blank, but you will need to change the defaults
# in the generated scripts.


Project Name (used for solution/project files): sharpKataStringCalc
Summary (a short description): A code kata for the string calculator exercise.
Description (longer description used by NuGet): The code kata, kicked off my Roy Osherove, this is my iteration of it (at least my first iteration of it).
Author: Adron Hall
Tags (separated by spaces): fsharp f# code kata stringcalculator
Github User or Organization: adron
Github Project Name (leave blank to use Project Name):

Once I hit enter after entering the information I’ve gotten more than a few of these broken builds.

Time Elapsed 00:00:00.1609190
Running build failed.
Building /Users/adronhall/Coderz/sharpKataStringCalc/sharpKataStringCalc.sln failed with exitcode 1.

Build Time Report
Target         Duration
------         --------
Clean          00:00:00.0019508
AssemblyInfo   00:00:00.0107624
Total:         00:00:00.6460652
Status:        Failure
  1) Building /Users/adronhall/Coderz/sharpKataStringCalc/sharpKataStringCalc.sln failed with exitcode 1.
  2) : /Users/adronhall/Coderz/sharpKataStringCalc/src/sharpKataStringCalc/sharpKataStringCalc.fsproj(0,0): Target named 'Rebuild' not found in the project.
  3) : /Users/adronhall/Coderz/sharpKataStringCalc/tests/sharpKataStringCalc.Tests/sharpKataStringCalc.Tests.fsproj(0,0): /Users/adronhall/Coderz/sharpKataStringCalc/tests/sharpKataStringCalc.Tests/sharpKataStringCalc.Tests.fsproj: The required attribute "Project" in Import is empty

This problem I was able to solve once, based on what I did in a previous blog entry “That Non-Windows Scaffolding for OS-X and Linux |> I Broke It! But…“. Which seemed odd that I fixed it previously. To help with the build I actually opened it up in Xamarin Studio. Now, one of the problems with doing this, is that it’s only available on Windows & OS-X. I’m however interested in using this stuff on Linux too, but that’s looking a bit more difficult the more I work with the toolchain unfortunately.

After working through the issue I found that on one OS-X box I’d installed Mono via make and F# via make and that messes things up. Do one or the other and you should be ok. So on my other two OS-X boxes (I’ve a personal retina and a work retina) the build worked flawlessly, and when it works flawlessly it looks like this toward the end of the build execution.

Finished Target: GenerateReferenceDocs
Starting Target: GenerateDocs (==> GenerateReferenceDocs, GenerateReferenceDocs)
Finished Target: GenerateDocs
Starting Target: All (==> GenerateDocs)
Finished Target: All

Build Time Report
Target                  Duration
------                  --------
Clean                   00:00:00.0035253
AssemblyInfo            00:00:00.0103142
Build                   00:00:04.9369669
CopyBinaries            00:00:00.0052210
RunTests                00:00:00.6568475
CleanDocs               00:00:00.0025772
GenerateHelp            00:00:08.6989318
GenerateReferenceDocs   00:00:11.7627584
GenerateDocs            00:00:00.0003409
All                     00:00:00.0000324
Total:                  00:00:26.1162623
Status:                 Ok

I’ve gotten this to work on OS-X and Windows just fine using the straight up ProjectScaffold and the ./build.sh. So all is good, I’m going to move forward with writing the kata based on that and loop back around to straighten out the Linux issues.

To run the tests, execute the following script after creating the project scaffold.

./build.sh RunTests

First off, what are the ideas behind the string calculator kata? Well here’s how Roy Osherove lays it out this particular code kata.

Before you start:

  • Try not to read ahead.
  • Do one task at a time. The trick is to learn to work incrementally.
  • Make sure you only test for correct inputs. there is no need to test for invalid inputs for this kata.

String Calculator

  1. Create a simple String calculator with a method int Add(string numbers)
    1. The method can take 0, 1 or 2 numbers, and will return their sum (for an empty string it will return 0) for example “” or “1” or “1 2”
    2. Start with the simplest test case of an empty string and move to 1 and two numbers
    3. Remember to solve things as simply as possible so that you force yourself to write tests you did not think about
    4. Remember to refactor after each passing test
  2. Allow the Add method to handle an unknown amount of numbers.
  3. Allow the Add method to handle new lines between numbers (instead of an empty space).
    1. the following input is ok: “1\n2 3” (will equal 6)
    2. the following input is NOT ok: “1 \n” (not need to prove it – just clarifying)
  4. Support different delimiters
    1. to change a delimiter, the beginning of the string will contain a separate line that looks like this: “//[delimiter]\n[numbers…]” for example “//;\n1;2” should return three where the default delimiter is ‘;’ .
    2. the first line is optional. all existing scenarios should still be supported
  5. Calling Add with a negative number will throw an exception “negatives not allowed” – and the negative that was passed.if there are multiple negatives, show all of them in the exception message
  6. Numbers bigger than 1000 should be ignored, so adding 2 + 1001 = 2
  7. Delimiters can be of any length with the following format: “//[delimiter]\n” for example: “//[***]\n1***2***3” should return 6
  8. Allow multiple delimiters like this: “//[delim1][delim2]\n” for example “//[*][%]\n1*2%3” should return 6.
  9. Make sure you can also handle multiple delimiters with length longer than one char.

Ok, so now that we’re clear on the string calculator, I’m going to dig into knocking out the first item, “Create a simple string calculator with a method int Add (string numbers)”

But first, in TDD fashion let’s write the test and make it fail first. I changed the code in the Tests.fs file in the tests directory and tests project to read as follows.

module sharpKataStringCalc.Tests

open System
open sharpKataStringCalc
open NUnit.Framework

type CalculatorTests() =
  member x.add_empty_string() =
    let calculator = Calculator()
    let result = calculator.Add ""
    Assert.That(result, Is.EqualTo 0)

That gets us a failing test, since we don’t even have any implementation yet. So now I’ll add the first part of the implementation code. First I created a Calculator.fs file and deleted the other file that ProjectScaffold put in there in the first place.

namespace sharpKataStringCalc

open System

type Calculator() = 
  member x.Add express = 

Ok, that gives me a passing test for the first phase of all this. Now since I’m a total F# newb still I’ve got to kind of dig around and read documentation while I’m working through this. So I’m taking a couple of hours while Roy’s suggestion is to use 30 minutes to do this kata. But I figured it is a good way to force myself to learn the syntax and start getting into an F# refactoring practice.

The first thing I started to do was write a test where I set the Calculator() again that looked something like this. I didn’t like that so I tried to pull it out of the test.

  [<TestCase("1", Result = 1)>]
  member x.Add_single_number_returns_that_number expression =
    let calculator = Calculator()
    calculator.Add expression

I ended up with something like this then.

let calculator = Calculator()

type CalculatorTests() =
  member x.add_empty_string() =
    let result = calculator.Add ""
    Assert.That(result, Is.EqualTo 0)

  [<TestCase("1", Result = 1)>]
  member x.Add_single_number_returns_that_number expression =
    calculator.Add expression

After adding that code with that little refactor I ran it, red light fail, so I then moved on to implementation for this test.

type Calculator() = 
  member x.Add expression = 
    match expression with
    | "" -> 0
    | _ -> 1

Everything passed. So now on to the next scenario other subsequent number strings. I add another test and result condition.

  [<TestCase("1", Result = 1)>]
  [<TestCase("2", Result = 2)>]
  member x.Add_single_number_returns_that_number expression =
    calculator.Add expression

It runs, gets a red light fail, I then implement with this minor addition.

type Calculator() = 
  member x.Add expression = 
    match expression with
    | "" -> 0
    | _ -> Int32.Parse expression

Before moving on, I’m just going to cover some of the syntax I’ve been using. The | delimits individual matches, individual discriminated union cases, and enumeration values. In this particular case I’m just using it to match the empty string or the
wildcard. Which speaking of, the _ is a wildcard match or specifies a generic parameter. To learn more about these in detail check out match expressions or generics. There are lots of good things in there.

The other syntax is somewhat more self-explanatory so I’m going to leave it as is for the moment. It is, in the end, when executing the tests evident what is going on at least. Alright, back to the kata. Let’s actually add two numbers. For the test I’m just going to add another TestCase with two actual numbers.

  [<TestCase("1", Result = 1)>]
  [<TestCase("2", Result = 2)>]
  [<TestCase("1 2", Result = 3)>]
  member x.Add_single_number_returns_that_number expression =
    calculator.Add expression

Fails, so on to implementation. I’m just going to do this the cheap “it works” way and do something dumb.

type Calculator() = 
  member x.Add expression = 
    match expression with
    | "" -> 0
    | _ when expression.Contains " " -> 3
    | _ -> Int32.Parse expression

That’ll give me a passing green light, but I’ll add another bit of attribute to the test and get another failing test.

  [<TestCase("1", Result = 1)>]
  [<TestCase("2", Result = 2)>]
  [<TestCase("1 2", Result = 3)>]
  [<TestCase("2 3", Result = 5)>]
  member x.Add_single_number_returns_that_number expression =
    calculator.Add expression

I’ll add the following code to implement and get a passing test.

type Calculator() = 
  member x.Add expression = 
    match expression with
    | "" -> 0
    | _ when expression.Contains " " -> 
        let numbers = expression.Split [| ' ' |]
        (Int32.Parse numbers.[0]) + (Int32.Parse numbers.[1])
    | _ -> Int32.Parse expression

Ok. So that part of the match looks for an empty space, and then takes the two numbers opposite sides of that empty space (array item 0 and 1) and then parses them and adds them together. Keep in mind that ‘ ‘ signifies a single character, and not a string, even though for the contains method that executes on a string, passing in a string with ” ” is ok and the appropriate actions are taken by the compiler.

For the tests I’m going to do a refactor and break them apart just a bit and rename them using the “ xyz “ technique of methods. After the refactor the code looked like this. I got this idea from the “Use F# to write unit tests with readable names” tip.

type CalculatorTests() =
  member x.``should return zero if no string value is passed in.``() =
    let result = calculator.Add ""
    Assert.That(result, Is.EqualTo 0)

  [<TestCase("1", Result = 1)>]
  [<TestCase("2", Result = 2)>]
  member x.``take one number and return that number`` expression =
    calculator.Add expression

  [<TestCase("1 2", Result = 3)>]
  [<TestCase("2 3", Result = 5)>]
  member x.``add single number to single number and return sum`` expression =
    calculator.Add expression

At this point I’m going to take a break, and wrap this up in a subsequent part of this series. It’s been a fun troubleshooting and getting started string calculator kata. So stay tuned and I’ll be slinging some F# math at ya real soon.


That Non-Windows Scaffolding for OS-X and Linux |> I Broke It! But…

I dove into the ProjectScaffold solution recently to see where I could get with this project. Just like in the instructions I first cloned the project.

git clone

Then executed the shell script to get an appropriate download of Paket and related tools.

$ ./build.sh

On OS-X my first attempt I got scaffolding but a bad build right off. See the video below for that example.

Trying the same thing on Ubuntu gave me this issue. This issue seemed to be different from the OS-X issue so I’m working to resolve it separately.

adron@ubuntu ~/C/ProjectScaffold> ./build.sh
No version specified. Downloading latest stable.
Github download failed. Try downloading Paket directly from 'nuget.org'.
Error getting response stream (Write: The authentication or decryption has failed.): SendFailure

Then trying it on OS-X gave me this issue.  :-/

Grumble grumble, fuss, fuss, alright, going into debugging and troubleshooting mode. I made a video of the exact steps I went through.

So if you have any ideas, let me know, I’m currently looking through the code and trying out some things. Once I get this working I’ll update this blog entry below the video with the updated resolution. Thanks!

UPDATED: Dammit, the dumbest things are what always punch me in the face the hardest. I fixed it, and it didn’t require a pull request after all! When naming a project be sure to use only string characters to be safe. As I wrote in the github issue, the name “sharp-kata-01” breaks the build in a way that gives completely erroneous messages. Once I renamed it things moved forward.

Why F#, and Why Not Windows

I posted my previous entry and got a few retweets and favorites. One reply came back and made me think, “ah, it might not be obvious why I’d like to have F# on something besides Windows.” Well, here’s a list of why I want to use F# on non-Windows platforms.

  1. F# is a good language. I can’t say the best, since I honestly don’t have enough experience with it or other functional languages to really declare a victory in my opinion. However I’ll be doing some work with Scala, Haskell, and Erlang in the next couple of weeks for testing and use with some upcoming projects.
  2. There are only two technology stacks that will let one spin up an actual application on all of these technologies: OS-X Cocoa, Windows, Linux, Android, and iOS. These two tech stacks are .NET and than the Node.js JavaScript stack – with the latter being purely web based. (Yes, some could argue Adobe’s tools or the Java stack, but I’m not going down that route right now, as both are somewhat bloated and convoluted in ways we can go into at some other time)
  3. With F# I get a clean functional language that I can build native mobile, tablet, or OS apps and all the web services that I want with two advantages over Node.js. The first is the performance edge and can likely be tuned more anyway. Being paired with SignalR one can even get some wicked simple and fast real-time capabilities with minimal code. The second is it takes less F# code to do similar JavaScript things and compute, let me tell you about compute with F#. F# can run things that JavaScript just really can’t measure up to when it comes to compute. But aside from these things, they’re both excellent tools and I wanted to have F# in my tool belt.
  4. There’s always the backup plan of just converting to JavaScript too, if I needed that sort of thing. Check out FunScript.
  5. The community around F# is actually pretty cool, there are good, solid, intelligent, and friendly people in that community. Having a good community of people always makes getting into a new language or related tech much better then when the community consists of asshats or jack ass savants.

Other great things that add to the usefulness of F# include WebSharper.NET MVC 5 and Web API, Nancy API, Suave.io, and there are others.

So those are the reasons I decided to move forward with F#: solid language, provides a solid technical stack with options, it’s functional and clean with extra compute power, and a kick ass community. Of course F# came from the land of Windows and Softies (that’s short for Microsofties, and I didn’t make that up). But F# was handed over to the open source community and currently moves forward autonomously of Microsoft. By proxy of this event, and other culminating events of late, F# can easily run on operating systems besides Windows. I’m not a fan of Windows, and here’s a few snarky (yet very real) reasons why I don’t even want to mess with Windows (except in the situation where I really do want to or need to use Visual Studio).

  1. Windows is still slow. I could go into the reasons, but it tends to build slow, behave slow, be prone to the attention of spammers and such, only in the last X years has it managed security in a half ass decent way, which also leads to slowness, and … oh you get the idea. It’s a slow OS.
  2. It’s flippin’ humongous. Now is this really a problem? Not really, but it’s annoying to force fit it in when I’m doing DevOps work or actually attempting to load Windows related images with it. The OS itself is still a nightmare of gigantic proportions compared to spooling up other systems. If one wants to fight with it, that’s great, I don’t really feel a keen desire to fight with it.
  3. Linux == Smaller footprint, more features, let’s not bring up security, is actually used on major systems, large scale systems and super-computers. Windows has less than 2% market share in that space. Even Microsoft is decreasing their reliance on Windows, offering oodles of Linux options.
  4. Windows doesn’t tend to get, run, or have the bleeding edge tech options built for it. Go look at the open source massive distributed systems applications and other excellent leading platforms and tooling that are leading companies into the future. If Windows is involved at all, it’s often an afterthought. :-/
  5. Windows 8 interface. I’m just going to leave that one right there. I like a lot about it, but I’m with Microsoft, even with Windows 10 they’re not trying to push this UI/UX catastrophe any longer.
  6. SSH not built in. End of story.

Don’t get me wrong, the tooling on Windows for doing Windows specific development and even doing crud apps with lots of business rules is spectacular. I’d even bet that the .NET ecosystem does a better job, sometimes dramatically better, than the Java ecosystem when it comes to those types of applications. I however, haven’t built these style of applications in a long while. Whenever I do, Windows might be a prime option, but otherwise I’ll stick to the operating systems that get me into the coding faster, sooner, and with less resistance.

Outside of Windows there are a lot of great Microsoft tools and technologies that I’d love to have on non-Windows operating systems. One of those is F#. Another is Visual Studio, which I’m betting will continue to get better and better. I’d like to have C# (which I do with Xamarin and such) and a whole ton of other scaffolding and crud tools and other things that are available. I just prefer them without Windows.

As I often say, to each their own. Mine just isn’t Windows these days.