I’m so mad!!! My response to the fork of node.js to io.js!

I’m so mad!!!

No, actually I’m not. This is cool.

iojs

It’s so confusing! No, it’s actually not. Use your learnings and read this Node Forward and read Max’s @maxogdenWhat you need to know.” gist.

It’ll be so hard to test this and test with node.js. Not really, again, read the threads there are a million different ways that you’ll be able to setup a clean build against either while keeping both around on your dev machine. Again, repeating myself, this is cool.

Summary for Devs: This is cool. It’s not going to wreck your projects. Just read up on it and it’ll all be a most excellent journey.

Summary for Decision Makers: Read @eranhammer‘s blog post here. TLDR; is, don’t second guess your decision to go with Node.js, don’t flip out about a Node.js or io.js investment, this isn’t anything more than a healthy ecosystem at work. It’ll be cool.

No excuse not to have your branching strategy taken care of, because: git-flow

git-flow

First, get it installed. This takes less than a minute, at least on a *nix based machine. I’ve no idea what it takes on Windows, but hey, at least it’s available there too! I did a clean curl and install as shown. It took about 14 seconds solely because I wasn’t typing very fast today.

12:28 $ curl -L -O https://raw.github.com/nvie/gitflow/develop/contrib/gitflow-installer.sh
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0
100  2145  100  2145    0     0   1732      0  0:00:01  0:00:01 --:--:--  1732
~
12:28 $ sudo bash gitflow-installer.sh
Password:
### gitflow no-make installer ###
Installing git-flow to /usr/local/bin
Cloning repo from GitHub to gitflow
Cloning into 'gitflow'...
remote: Counting objects: 1407, done.
remote: Total 1407 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0)
Receiving objects: 100% (1407/1407), 623.29 KiB | 428.00 KiB/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (689/689), done.
Checking connectivity... done.
Updating submodules
Submodule 'shFlags' (git://github.com/nvie/shFlags.git) registered for path 'shFlags'
Cloning into 'shFlags'...
remote: Counting objects: 454, done.
remote: Total 454 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0)
Receiving objects: 100% (454/454), 130.91 KiB | 0 bytes/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (337/337), done.
Checking connectivity... done.
Submodule path 'shFlags': checked out '2fb06af13de884e9680f14a00c82e52a67c867f1'
install: gitflow/git-flow -> /usr/local/bin/git-flow
install: gitflow/git-flow-init -> /usr/local/bin/git-flow-init
install: gitflow/git-flow-feature -> /usr/local/bin/git-flow-feature
install: gitflow/git-flow-hotfix -> /usr/local/bin/git-flow-hotfix
install: gitflow/git-flow-release -> /usr/local/bin/git-flow-release
install: gitflow/git-flow-support -> /usr/local/bin/git-flow-support
install: gitflow/git-flow-version -> /usr/local/bin/git-flow-version
install: gitflow/gitflow-common -> /usr/local/bin/gitflow-common
install: gitflow/gitflow-shFlags -> /usr/local/bin/gitflow-shFlags
~

For installation instructions check out the link here: https://github.com/nvie/gitflow/wiki/Installation

Now that everything is setup. Here’s the quick getting started of creating a repo, linking it up to a remote and working in a repository. The first step is to initialize a new repo. Continue reading

AWS Beanstalk Worker with Node.js and SQS

First I created a project for the node.js worker. The first steps for this are identical to that of creating the Hapi.js site that publishes messages to the queue. Go through these three steps for the worker and then I’ll continue from there.

  1. First create the web application which will act as our worker service. I gave mine the name of testing-aws-sqs-worker, the site publishing to the queue I called testing-aws-sqs-site.
  2. Next add dependencies needed, like mocha.
  3. Finally make sure the AWS environment variables are set appropriately.

…and now on to the security, configuration and worker specific parts of this series…

Continue reading

Setting up a Hapi.js App that sends work to a Node.js AWS Worker via SQS


First I created a project for the node.js web application.

$ npm init
This utility will walk you through creating a package.json file.
It only covers the most common items, and tries to guess sane defaults.

See `npm help json` for definitive documentation on these fields
and exactly what they do.

Use `npm install &pkg& --save` afterwards to install a package and
save it as a dependency in the package.json file.

Press ^C at any time to quit.
name: (testing-aws-sqs-site)
version: (0.0.0) 0.0.1
description: This project that will feed data to the queue for the AWS SQS sample.
entry point: (index.js) server.js
test command: mocha
git repository: (https://github.com/Adron/testing-aws-sqs-site.git)
keywords: aws, sqs, elastic, elastic beanstalk, queue, worker
author: Adron Hall
license: (ISC) Apache 2.0

Continue reading

Setting up an AWS SQS Queue for Use With Node.js Beanstalk Worker Instances

Before diving straight in, I’m going to outline the specific goals and what I am using to accomplish these goals. The goal is to have a simple web application, that will get some element of data posted to a queue. The queue will then have data that a worker service needs to then process. As I step through each of these requirements I’ll determine the actual push and pull mechanisms that will get the job done.

Continue reading

Top 4: “Nobody Reads Blogs… Except Everybody Read Blogs”

I know I know, the marketers say it’s all about the single articles now. Nobody reads blogs. Nobody subscribes to blogs. Ya know, except of course for that small percentage of people that do.

…marketing, it’ll make you insane if you’re not careful.

Blog

But seriously, here’s a few blogs that are actually worth reading. They’re worth subscribing to and surprisingly, they’re blogs that businesses organize and write. Yes, I have and might be writing for some of them in the future. But I’m honestly basing this list on a few specific criteria:

  • The blog has to include some technical content that is important to getting kick started with their product and getting kick started with other tooling around their space.
  • The blog has to include articles that have industry information that is relevant to conferences, meetups, and other community related activities.

Here’s my list of reads lately:

Continue reading

BDD Style Test Phrasing… What’s Your Poison?

I’ve had this question come up a few times recently, and I wanted to get everybody’s take on it…  when you write BDD style tests, what practice do you prefer?

…I’ll have a follow up to this poll in a few days and explain some of my own reasoning to the whole situation.